Small text iconNormal text iconLarge text icon

INTERACTION

 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MembersMembers   GroupsGroups   RegisterRegister 
 User Control PanelUser Control Panel      LoginLogin 


All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 67 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2007 11:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 3:11 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: Cheshire, UK
Thanks for the plug with your reading Steven. Interzone on Youtube, must be a first?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 1:22 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2007 10:14 pm
Posts: 84
Location: North Kansas City, Missouri, United States
Well, certainly a first for me, Roy. Surely someone else has done a public reading from Interzone or one of the other mags and posted it by now.

I sent a release to Locus but I guess that one didn't make the cut.

That said, I did everything I could to push the mag short of taking people hostage. :lol:

The after reading video (at the blog) is even funnier. The owner and I regale each other with near death experiences by semi-tractor trailer.

Hopefully I'll be doing another one soon. Maybe we can get Tim Akers and some of the other Americans to come in. Or perhaps (gasp) someone from Overseas. Now that'd be cool!

Respects,
S. F. Murphy
Back in Missouri, God Help Me.

_________________
On the Outer Marches


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 2:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 3:06 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Chicago
The reading did make Locus' website, I think.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 8:31 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2007 10:14 pm
Posts: 84
Location: North Kansas City, Missouri, United States
Tim, considering how many apple carts I've upset over the last week or two(elsewhere on the net in really stupid arguments), I should probably color myself grateful that the reading got listed. :roll:

Seemed to be a very kid oriented issue, now that I think on it. Rachel's story, yours, mine, and I suppose even the La Riazza story with another coming of age piece.

I've really enjoyed reading them. Much different fare from other publications, if I do say so myself.

Respects,
S. F. Murphy
Back in Missouri, Damn It.

_________________
On the Outer Marches


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2007 7:58 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 6:11 pm
Posts: 189
Location: 's-Hertogenbosch
Lois Tilton reviewed Interzone #210 (and many other magazines) on the Internet Review of Science Fiction, here (you may need to register, or subscribe to get access).

She recommends "Being an Incredibly Long Intro to 'The Final Voyage of La Riaza', a Circumstantial Title in Eight Parts" (I really think we could have cut the title a wee bit... :wink: ) and "Dr Abernathy's Dream Theater", likes "Preachers", finds "Tearing Down Tuesday"
Quote:
...a message story of a coming-of-age, and a bit on the emotionally manipulative side.
, was unable to suspend her disbelief during "Heartstrung", and holds back judgment from "Toke", because:
Quote:
Disclaimer—I workshopped an earlier draft of this story.
.

_________________
In the Plane of the Ecliptic


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 12:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:26 pm
Posts: 51
As a big fan of Heartstrung, which rates as one of my favourite stories in the past few issues of Interzone, I am gobsmacked, and, conversely not really surprised by an SF reviewer who was unable to suspend disbelief.

That's the trouble with genre fiction, sometimes, when it's reviewed. It's often reviewed by purists - who just won't countenance interstitial work like magical realism (which I think Heartrung is closer in spirit to than it is to SF), or SF/horror, or eve (God forbid!) humourous or surreal SF.

I'm sorry you didn't get it Lois. Shame. You missed something special.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 1:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 3:06 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Chicago
Not everyone wants their stories to be art. Some people want their stories to be stories. *shrug*


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 2:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 5:24 pm
Posts: 60
Location: Waterloo, Iowa, USA
John, surely Lois Tilton has the same right to an opinion as everyone else. She has the right to like, dislike, believe, or disbelieve a story for any reason she deems fit. Even when her reviews are not positive I find them thoughtful and intelligent. I happen to disagree with her about "Heartstrung," but that's okay. There isn't a right or wrong, there's only personal taste. That story worked for you and me. It didn't work for her. We can all still be friends. :D

Tim, I think it's worthwhile to try to achieve both story and art. They're not mutually exclusive. I don't read simply for entertainment's sake. Yeah, I like to be entertained, but if I don't also learn something or feel something, or somehow be changed by the experience, then I'm likely to forget the story as soon as I set it down. For me, a large part of that learning or feeling or changing comes from the author's skill in using language--his or her art, in other words. Asimov had killer story ideas (well, when I was twelve, anyway), but his prose is so uninspired and his characters so flat that I can't read him any more.

But, as I said above to John, it's all personal taste. Whatever works for you, works for you. What works for me works for me. It's all good.

And just so there's no misunderstanding here, I've not read "Toke" in 210 yet, so nothing in this post refers to your writing specifically.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Art or stories
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 2:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:26 pm
Posts: 51
Tim - I agree with you. I wasn't suggesting anything had to be art. I just thought it dismissive for a reviewer to effectively disregard a story on the grounds of being unable to suspend disbelief. In other words, if you accept the story isn't hard SF (which it isn't), then why not review it on its own terms rather than against hard SF criteria (which would involve suspending disbelief).

And I thought your story was absolutely terrific also, but for very different reasons.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 2:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 3:06 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Chicago
Thanks, John. And Dave, I'm a big proponent of art and story coexisting. I tend to dislike stories that lean too heavily in one direction or the other, mainly because I was badly guilty of rocking art at the expense of story in my early career. Disabusing myself of that tendency has left me overly critical of that problem in other writers. As Lois says in her review, we're in the same writing group, so I've seen her tear apart many, many stories. She can be uncomfortably insightful at times. I don't always agree with her, but I always listen to her critiques carefully and consider the ramifications.

In the case of Toke, I happen to know that she feels I was too heavily influenced by Mieville in that one. It's been an interesting process for me, creating the world of Veridon. Writing the four or five stories (three of them sold to Interzone) that comprise the world so far has been a process of active creation, where I'm figuring out the world as I write. Sometimes bits of the structure poke through the narrative, and there are things I wish I could dissolve from the canon. But the overall effect has been satisfactory.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 3:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 3:11 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: Cheshire, UK
Quote:
I just thought it dismissive for a reviewer to effectively disregard a story on the grounds of being unable to suspend disbelief.


Hard SF or otherwise I think you have to 'fall under the spell' of a story to fully engage and so it has to be plausible in its own terms. You could call that willing suspension of disbelief and if Ms Tilton found that impossible then it's a legitimate reason to be critical of the work.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Heartstrung again
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 4:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:26 pm
Posts: 51
Thanks for comments on my comment - looks like energetic feedback! Your points are well made. And, yes, everyone has a right to agree or disagree, to like or dislike.

I guess I was effectively wearing my own heart on my sleeve in support of fiction which steps outside the tropes and conventions of SF. And, naturally, that sort of fiction won't be liked by some.

Though I like your point, Roy, about the importance of "falling under the spell" of a story. Yes, absolutely, that applies to any sort of writing (apart from computer manuals, of course!).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 8:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 3:11 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: Cheshire, UK
Quote:
Though I like your point, Roy, about the importance of "falling under the spell" of a story. Yes, absolutely, that applies to any sort of writing (apart from computer manuals, of course!).



Au contraire, I fall under their spell all too easily and only recover when my elbow slips and the sudden jolt wakes me. :oops:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 1:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:26 pm
Posts: 51
Hi, all. I ran this past Andy before posting, and he's fine with it.

I'm offering a 10 per cent discount on my creative writing courses in Bulgaria for Interzone and TTA Press people - forum posters included. I've not published in Interzone, but I've had three honourable mentions in Year's Best Fantasy and Horror and this great quote from Michael Moorcock: "John Dodds is one of the most promising new writers I have read for some time. I highly recommend his work." Plus IZ's estimable Peter Tenant gave one of my stories, Anatomy of Seahorses, a great review last year:
http://www.ookami.co.uk/html/horror_express__4.html.

I'm running a course in August and some next year also - lots of socialising thrown in, and you can use our house as a base - me and Carole are sociable people, and a few glasses of wine or beer with us of an evening would definitely be on the cards - plus a boozy barbie on the first weekend. Oh, and beer in Bulgaria is cheap (about 30 pence a pint). Eating out is very, very cheap also, as is accommodation.

Tempted? You can find out more on the website:
http://www.creativehols.com

And feel free to drop me a line directly for more info:

citrus30 (at) hotmail (dot) com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 2:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 6:11 pm
Posts: 189
Location: 's-Hertogenbosch
And a review of Interzone #210 on BestSF.

Mark Watson -- admitting a crush on an actress 'young enough to be his daughter' -- felt the issue was 'almost like a juvenile sf issue'.

Surprised? You won't be after you read the review... :mrgreen:

_________________
In the Plane of the Ecliptic


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 67 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group