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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2007 12:13 pm 
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cycloid wrote:
The short story i mentioned specifically mentions "10 year synced" glass....

Funny, I was sure 'slow glass' came from a novel rather than a short story. But looking at Bob Shaw's wikipedia entry, it appears you're right - it comes from 'Light of Other Days'. Unless he re-used it for a novel, of course.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2007 6:19 pm 
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http://mundane-sf.blogspot.com/2007/06/ ... story.html

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2007 11:13 am 
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My current (not quite mundane) project starts with the protagonist asking a question, though i have to admit the reply he recieves is partly designed to sum up the entire setting so that i can get on with telling the story, rather than as a lure to suck the reader in. Hopefully it'll have that effect though :-)


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 8:12 pm 
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Novelist Geoff Ryman, one of the three guest editors of the mundane Interzone issue, has an essay about mundane science fiction in the June 2007 New York Review of Science Fiction. Titled "Take the Third Star on the Left and on til Morning," the essay is based on a talk he gave in Montreal on how he believes too much of science fiction is based on an adolescent desire to run away from our world. While he sees nothing wrong with this desire in and of itself (since the desire is rooted in the need of human children to eventually leave their parents' home), he notes that humans are not truly considered grown-up until they create a new home of their own. He says science fiction is big enough to take in both dreams--the dream of leaving home and the dream of making a home and becoming an adult. To Ryman, mundane science fiction focuses on this last aspect.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 9:12 pm 
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JasonSanford wrote:
..need of human children to eventually leave their parents' home... not truly considered grown-up until they create a new home of their own


Ah, but what about the 'dream' of inheriting the parents' home?
:wink:

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2007 8:21 am 
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Tony wrote:
JasonSanford wrote:
..need of human children to eventually leave their parents' home... not truly considered grown-up until they create a new home of their own


Ah, but what about the 'dream' of inheriting the parents' home?
:wink:


As it stands in the UK, both are increasingly unattainable dreams ...

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:54 am 
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Mike A wrote:
cycloid wrote:
The short story i mentioned specifically mentions "10 year synced" glass....

Funny, I was sure 'slow glass' came from a novel rather than a short story. But looking at Bob Shaw's wikipedia entry, it appears you're right - it comes from 'Light of Other Days'. Unless he re-used it for a novel, of course.


He did. <i>Other Days, Other Eyes</i> (which Wikipedia incorrectly calls a collection) is a full-length novel using the slow glass premise. It incorporates the original "Light of Other Days" short story and two others as "sidelights", i.e. self-contained episodes within the narrative of the novel - somewhat awkwardly as I remember - I read it over twenty-five years ago.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:21 am 
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M John Harrison comments on the Mundane SF issue/project in his blog.

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 Post subject: Mundane Sci Fi
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 6:46 pm 
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Maybe it's just me, but I'm amazed people are having trouble with the very simple request by Interzone for no fake science.

I'm working on something, and if I don't use any I'll be OK for consideration...

I just don't understand the constant questions wanting the bleedin' obvious answers :?


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 Post subject: Mundane SF
PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 11:10 pm 
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I think everything I've written would be "mundane SF"... I have something perfect, if it's rejected in time from another market. :wink:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 9:14 am 
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You don't have much time. Deadline 31 October


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 8:34 pm 
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Same here: the story I wanted to submit is under consideration elsewhere, so I'm applying finishing touches to another.

There is nothing about the format on the submission form. I presume it's plain text with italics like _this_ and a blank line between paragraphs? What about scene breaks (2 blank lines, #, or what) and indents?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:32 pm 
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I'm curious about the stats for the Mundane issue. Have you been getting a huge load of submissions? Are too many of them off track? How many brain-download ones (for example) have you been getting?

Also, when will the first rejections start coming through? Not that I'm complaining.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 10:22 pm 
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You are not the first to ask but the editorial team is completely separate to the normal TTA team and hence they are the ones to ask.

I suspect 'huge load' will be an understatement but don't know.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2007 2:16 pm 
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Hmm, are the editorial team still following this thread?


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